Monday, February 11, 2019

Netiquette Security Alert 2/11/19 - SB19-042: Vulnerability Summary for the Week of February 4, 2019



02/11/2019 08:37 AM EST

Original release date: February 11, 2019
The US-CERT Cyber Security Bulletin provides a summary of new vulnerabilities that have been recorded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD) in the past week The NVD is sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) / United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT). For modified or updated entries, please visit the NVD, which contains historical vulnerability information.
The vulnerabilities are based on the CVE vulnerability naming standard and are organized according to severity, determined by the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) standard. The division of high, medium, and low severities correspond to the following scores:
·        High - Vulnerabilities will be labeled High severity if they have a CVSS base score of 7.0 - 10.0
·        Medium - Vulnerabilities will be labeled Medium severity if they have a CVSS base score of 4.0 - 6.9
·        Low - Vulnerabilities will be labeled Low severity if they have a CVSS base score of 0.0 - 3.9
Entries may include additional information provided by organizations and efforts sponsored by US-CERT. This information may include identifying information, values, definitions, and related links. Patch information is provided when available. Please note that some of the information in the bulletins is compiled from external, open source reports and is not a direct result of US-CERT analysis.
The NCCIC Weekly Vulnerability Summary Bulletin is created using information from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD). In some cases, the vulnerabilities in the Bulletin may not yet have assigned CVSS scores. Please visit NVD for updated vulnerability entries, which include CVSS scores once they are available.

Saturday, February 9, 2019

Netiquette IQ Blog For 2/9/2019 command-and-control server (C&C server)



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February is Black History Month And Pantone Color Month(Coral in 2019)








Buy the books at

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki
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command-and-control server (C&C server)
from whatis.com
A command-and-control server (C&C server) is a computer that issues directives to digital devices that have been infected with rootkits or other types of malware, such as ransomware. C&C servers can be used to create powerful networks of infected devices capable of carrying out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, stealing data, deleting data or encrypting data in order to carry out an extortion scheme. In the past, a C&C server was often under an attacker's physical control and could remain active for several years. Today, C&C servers generally have a short shelf life; they often reside in legitimate cloud services and use automated domain generation algorithms (DGAs) to make it more difficult for law enforcement and white hat malware hunters to locate them.
A malicious network under a C&C server's control is called a botnet and the network nodes that belong to the botnet are sometimes referred to as zombies. In a traditional botnet, the bots are infected with a Trojan horse and use Internet Relay Chat (IRC) to communicate with a central C&C server. These botnets were often used to distribute spam or malware and gather misappropriated information, such as credit card numbers.
Popular botnet topologies include:
  • Star topology - the bots are organized around a central server.
  • Multi-server topology - there are multiple C&C servers for redundancy.
  • Hierarchical topology - multiple C&C servers are organized into tiered groups.
  • Random topology - co-opted computers communicate as a peer-to-peer botnet (P2P botnet).
Since IRC communication was typically used to command botnets, it is often guarded against. This has motivated the drive for more covert ways for C&C servers to issue commands. Alternative channels used for botnet command include JPG images, Microsoft Word files and posts from LinkedIn or Twitter dummy accounts.