Saturday, January 10, 2015

Netiquette Core Principles For Responding To Invitations (evites) - Via Netiquette IQ

 Responding to email invitations


        There are many important Netiquette basics to maintain in a reply to an email invitation. It should be emphasized that a prompt response is tantamount when replying to such an email, in particular when there are multiple attendees.

Some useful Netiquette tips


  1. If an offline meeting has been scheduled, it is best to follow up with   an immediate email. Requesting a confirmation is a necessity.
  2. The inviter should send a confirmation email the day before an appointment. If the appointment is in two weeks or more, a reminder should be sent every seven to ten business days.
  3. If a meeting attendee is required to travel, this should be stated in a confirmation email with a cutoff date/time for cancellation.
  4. Confirmations should include the specifics of a meeting, not just a plain statement.
  5. Provide reasonable lead time in scheduling appointments, particularly for those with multiple attendees.
  6. Focus the time, date, and location to best accommodate everyone required to be there, or those who typically have less available time.
  7. If an appointment has high importance for any of the attendees, it is essential to state this clearly in all of the correspondence.
  8. If travel expense or extended effort is necessary, a cancellation deadline should be politely stated.
  9. In current times with fewer meetings occurring, it is financially important that all details and items be thoroughly and explicitly clear.

10.    Specify all items attendees should or are expected to bring.

11.    Items to show in all email appointments include the following:

 a)   Location with street address, floor, and room number

b)   Time (identify time zone) with day of the week, date

c)   Expected duration with hard stop times, if any

d)   Directions, maps, or how to get them

e)   Dress code

f)    Accessibility, parking

g)   Location accessibility, including alternate phone numbers

12. Send reminder messages. Include date and time in the subject field. Get to the point and provide a means of contact, similar to what one would do when making an appointment.
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premieere book on Netiquette, " Netiquette IQ - A comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki

 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ. 
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Netiquette IQ Technical Terms Of The Day - FLAPE & FLOUD - Do You Know What Thev Are?

 
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FLAPE and FLOUD
FLAPE is an approach to tiered storage that relies on two storage technologies, flash plus tape.

This approach uses flash storage as primary storage but also writes a copy to a linear tape file system. When the data is being accessed frequently, it is recalled from flash. When the data is no longer being accessed frequently, it can be deleted from flash storage and the permanent, archival copy will still reside on tape.

FLOUD, a similar approach to tiered storage, also uses flash for primary storage and cloud storage for secondary storage. Both approaches allow storage administrators to store data immediately into the archive as it is written to primary storage so that instead of moving data into the archive at some later point in time, a file that has reached its archive point can simply be deleted from the primary storage.
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In addition to this blog, I maintain a radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo.  I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ.

I am the president of Tabula Rosa Systems, a “best of breed” reseller of products for communications, email, network management software, security products and professional services.  Also, I am the president of Netiquette IQ. We are currently developing an email IQ rating system, Netiquette IQ, which promotes the fundamentals outlined in my book.

Over the past twenty-five years, I have enjoyed a dynamic and successful career and have attained an extensive background in IT and electronic communications by selling and marketing within the information technology marketplace.Anyone who would like to review the book and have it posted on my blog or website, please contact me paul@netiquetteiq.com.

If you have not already done so, please view the trailer for my book below. 

Good Netiquette IQ to all!
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Friday, January 9, 2015

Netiquette IQ Blog Of The Day - If You Think The Internet Lacks Privacy Now, Wait Until The Internet Of Things (IoT)



The Internet of Things is the key cyberspace topic at this time and probably for a long while ahead.With all of the current dialog going on with cyber security and identity theft, the IoT promises, unfortunately, to make vulnerabilities and lack of privacy far more pervasive! The article below will tell you some of the reasons why.

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Welcome to the dystopian [not a good place, the opposite of Utopia, ed.] Internet of Things, powered by and starring you.

Summary: The data trail we leave behind could be used against us in unexpected ways.
By Steve Ranger | January 7, 2015 -- 12:58 GMT (04:58 PST) zdnet.com
While the tech industry is looking to connected homes, cars, and wearable tech for new sources of profits, critics are already warning of the security and privacy headaches ahead.
In a speech at this week's CES in Las Vegas, the chairwoman of the US Federal Trade Commission Edith Ramirez warned that by embedding sensors in every object we interact with, and allowing them to record nearly everything we do, the Internet of Things will throw up some difficult and as yet unresolved questions for businesses and consumers.
The rise of objects that connect themselves to the internet -- from cars to heart monitors to stoplights -- is unleashing a wave of new possibilities for data gathering, predictive analytics, and IT automation. We discuss how to tap these nascent solutions.
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She said that while the IoT has the potential for enormous benefits for consumers, there are also "significant privacy and security implications" which could undermine trust in the technology. "Trust is as important to the widespread consumer adoption of new IoT products and services as a network connection is to the functionality of an IoT device," she said.
Ramirez said companies building IoT products should focus on security, minimise the amount of data they gather, and give consumers more notice about the information that the devices collect and how it's used.
Ramirez said that in the not too distant future, many, if not most, aspects of our everyday lives will leave a digital trail.
"That data trove will contain a wealth of revealing information that, when patched together, will present a deeply personal and startlingly complete picture of each of us - one that includes details about our financial circumstances, our health, our religious preferences, and our family and friends. The introduction of sensors and devices into currently intimate spaces - like our homes, cars, and even our bodies - poses particular challenges," she said.
The potential scale of the data generated by IoT devices means companies can conduct analysis that would not be possible otherwise, "providing the ability to make additional sensitive inferences and compile even more detailed profiles of consumer behaviour," she warned.
"Will the information flowing in from our smart cars, smart devices, and smart cities just swell the ocean of big data which could allow information to be used in ways that are inconsistent with consumers' expectations or relationship with a company?" she asked.
Ramirez painted a grim picture of a connected world that could be used by businesses in unexpected and unwelcome ways.
"Your smart TV and tablet may track whether you watch the history channel or reality television, but will your TV-viewing habits be shared with prospective employers or universities? Will they be shared with data brokers, who will put those nuggets together with information collected by your parking lot security gate, your heart monitor, and your smartphone?
"And will this information be used to paint a picture of you that you will not see but that others will - people who might make decisions about whether you are shown ads for organic food or junk food, where your call to customer service is routed, and what offers of credit and other products you receive?" she asked.
The answer to all these questions is likely to be 'yes', unless consumers and regulators force change: just as with social networks much of the value that comes from IoT devices is likely to be in the data they generate about us.
Ramirez noted: "And, as businesses use the vast troves of data generated by connected devices to segment consumers to determine what products are marketed to them, the prices they are charged, and the level of customer service they receive, will it exacerbate existing socioeconomic disparities? We cannot continue down the path toward pervasive data collection without thinking hard about all of these questions."
She warned that the small scale and limited processing power of many connected devices could inhibit their ability to use encryption and other robust security measures and, because such devices will be effectively disposable, it may be all but impossible to update the software or apply a security patch.
She said companies should conduct a privacy or security risk assessment as part of the design process and test security measures before products launch, and consider encryption, particularly for the storage and transmission of sensitive information, such as health data.
She also said companies should limit the amount of data they collect: "Consumers know, for instance, that a smart thermostat is gathering information about their heating habits, and that a fitness band is collecting data about their physical activity. But would they expect this information to be shared with data brokers or marketing firms? Probably not."
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In addition to this blog, I maintain a radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo.  I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ.

I am the president of Tabula Rosa Systems, a “best of breed” reseller of products for communications, email, network management software, security products and professional services.  Also, I am the president of Netiquette IQ. We are currently developing an email IQ rating system, Netiquette IQ, which promotes the fundamentals outlined in my book.

Over the past twenty-five years, I have enjoyed a dynamic and successful career and have attained an extensive background in IT and electronic communications by selling and marketing within the information technology marketplace.Anyone who would like to review the book and have it posted on my blog or website, please contact me paul@netiquetteiq.com.

If you have not already done so, please view the trailer for my book below. 

Good Netiquette IQ to all!
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Netiquette IQ Quotation Of The Day - Time And Benjamin Franklin


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"Lost time is never found again."
-Benjamin Franklin
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In addition to this blog, I maintain a radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo.  I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ.

I am the president of Tabula Rosa Systems, a “best of breed” reseller of products for communications, email, network management software, security products and professional services.  Also, I am the president of Netiquette IQ. We are currently developing an email IQ rating system, Netiquette IQ, which promotes the fundamentals outlined in my book.

Over the past twenty-five years, I have enjoyed a dynamic and successful career and have attained an extensive background in IT and electronic communications by selling and marketing within the information technology marketplace.Anyone who would like to review the book and have it posted on my blog or website, please contact me paul@netiquetteiq.com.

If you have not already done so, please view the trailer for my book below. 
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Thursday, January 8, 2015

Netiquette IQ Blog Of The Day -What Happens When Our Clocks Lose A Second?



Just like the calendar year with leaps years and their intermittent skips of the extra day, our time needs to be adjusted usually for just a second. Although this seems trivial, it can possibly have significant impact. See below for some possibilities!
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2015 is getting an extra second and that's a bit of a problem for the internet 

By James Vincent
on January 7, 2015 01:47 pm 
On June 30th at precisely 23:59:59, the world’s atomic clocks will pause for a single second. Or, to be more precise, they’ll change to the uncharted time of 23:59:60 — before ticking over to the more worldly hour of 00:00:00 on the morning of July 1st, 2015. This addition of a leap second, announced by the Paris Observatory this week, is being added to keep terrestrial clocks in step with the vagaries of astronomical time — in this case, the slowing of the Earth’s rotation. And it's a bit of a headache for computer engineers.
What causes leap seconds? Earthquakes, tidal drag, the weather.

Leap seconds are like the Y2K bug in that they threaten to throw out of sync time as measured by computers and time as measured by atomic clocks. But while Y2K was a single instance (computer systems that were used to abbreviating the year to two digits were confused by "2000" and "1900"), the addition of leap seconds are a regular problem. The first was added back in 1972; this year’s will be the 26th, and they're not likely to stop coming. They're also broadly unpredictable: earthquakes, tidal drag, and the weather all affect the rotation of the Earth, and it’s up to the scientists at the International Earth Rotation Service to keep an eye on things and call the changes as they come.

Unfortunately, when the last leap second was added back in 2012, more than a few sites had trouble keeping pace. As reported by Phys.org, Foursquare, Reddit, LinkedIn, and StumbledUpon all crashed when the leap second ticked unexpectedly into place. In the case of Reddit, the problem was eventually traced back to a Linux subsystem that got confused when it checked the Network Time Protocol only to find an extra second. Speaking to Wired about the problem back in 2012, Linux creator Linus Torvalds commented: "Almost every time we have a leap second, we find something. It’s really annoying, because it’s a classic case of code that is basically never run, and thus not tested by users under their normal conditions."
Google solves the problem of the extra second by cutting it into milliseconds
Instead, companies have been forced to create their own workaround, with Google’s "leap smear" perhaps the best-known example. As the company’s site reliability engineer Christopher Pascoe explained in a blog post, the usual fix is to turn back the clocks by one second at the end of the day, essentially playing that second again. However, says Pascoe, this creates problems: "What happens to write operations that happen during that second? Does email that comes in during that second get stored correctly?" Google’s solution is to cut the extra second into milliseconds and then sprinkle these tiny portions of time into the system imperceptibly throughout the day. "This [means] that when it became time to add an extra second at midnight," says Pascoe, "our clocks [have] already taken this into account, by skewing the time over the course of the day."

Could we detach our concept of time from the solar day?
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In addition to this blog, I maintain a radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo.  I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ.

I am the president of Tabula Rosa Systems, a “best of breed” reseller of products for communications, email, network management software, security products and professional services.  Also, I am the president of Netiquette IQ. We are currently developing an email IQ rating system, Netiquette IQ, which promotes the fundamentals outlined in my book.

Over the past twenty-five years, I have enjoyed a dynamic and successful career and have attained an extensive background in IT and electronic communications by selling and marketing within the information technology marketplace.Anyone who would like to review the book and have it posted on my blog or website, please contact me paul@netiquetteiq.com.

If you have not already done so, please view the trailer for my book below. 
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