Saturday, July 5, 2014

Netiquette IQ - The Importance Of Being Fluent In The Language Of Texting


Albert Einstein would have a difficult time texting!
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Nick Morgan Contributor
ForbesWoman6/23/2014 10:46AM
The Importance Of Being Fluent In The Language Of Texting
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Can we tlk?
On the eve of the Battle of Bull Run, Major Sullivan Ballou of the 2nd Rhode Island Volunteers wrote to his wife about his fears of dying (justified as things turned out) in the coming battle.
“I shall always be near you; in the brightest day and in the darkest night—amidst your happiest scenes and gloomiest hours—always, always; and if there be a soft breeze upon your cheek, it shall be my breath; or the cool air fans your throbbing temple, it shall be my spirit passing by. Sarah, do not mourn me dead; think I am gone and wait for me, for we shall meet again.”
They don’t write ‘em like that anymore.
A little more than 60 years later, the major might have confided: “rly scrd. mite not mk it. luv u. C u on otr side.”
There is wide concern that eloquence has fallen victim to expediency, that the thoughtful phrase has been replaced by the fascicle contraction, that communication is suffering, and that texting bears the brunt of the blame. In a 2012 study published in the journal New Media & Society, researchers at Wake Forest University found a correlation between the use of SMS-abbreviations and the increasing inability among students to identify and use correct grammar; the more texts the 10-to-14-year-olds in the study sent, the worse their grammar performance.  “Sometimes it’s like there are two languages in your head,” the teenaged daughter of a close friend recently told me. “The language you use for texting and the language you use for homework.” And although a 2013 study published in the journal Linguistics and Translation concluded that most users are “context conscious,” and are adept at switching from text speak to writing that calls for more formality, is it any wonder the two sometimes intersect?
If conversation is an art, art takes practice. Today, that practice time is used up screen-to-screen, rather than face-to-face or through composing a well-constructed letter. And yet the reports of the death of eloquent expression may be greatly exaggerated. If we look at what the age of digital information—and texting and other forms of digital shorthand in particular—has done to the art of interpersonal communication, all is not lost. It’s just different. And in some world-changing ways: better.
Language has a rich history of evolution. It is not meant to be stagnant. Writing, at an estimated 5,000 years old, is itself is a mere babe compared to language, which traces back at least 80,000 years. Each year, new words are added to the dictionary to represent the changing nature of language—150 last year alone, including three explicitly linked to texting culture: srsly (text speak for “seriously”), emoji (the emoticons and smileys used often in text messages), and TL:DR (short for “Too long, didn’t read.”) Just as writing became a new way of expressing language all those thousands of years ago, texting is a new form of expression entirely representative of the way we communicate today—that is, quickly, economically, and on the go. As such, it is no better or worse than the introduction of email before it or the telegram before that. Just different.
There is reason to believe that the fluency text speak requires of people is helping to make them adaptable in a world that is dominated by fast-paced, tech-heavy startups; a world that requires adaptability in order to survive and thrive. Language is about delivering information, and throughout history we have needed to adjust to mediums and people if we want to be understood. Recently, a friend my age texted; “Running late see u lunch 1215 diner” The punctuation was abominable; there was no syntax to speak of. And yet I knew what she meant.
There are other benefits. Studies also show that texting can enable those who are shy or lack confidence to be more socially outgoing, and that texting may help foster an increase in emotional expression. It’s true that texting may reduce the boundaries and make saying what we mean easier; that’s not always a bad thing, whether for the man too shy to tell his new girlfriend how he feels or the colleague too meek to stand up in person to the office bully. Some schools have begun using texting as a way to help encourage students to participate more in class. In one case study, students who were less likely to speak up in discussions in class were far more likely to respond in discussions conducted via text. Research published in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology  found texting could actually have a positive impact on reading and language development. “Text speak”, the study found, correlates with  higher reading ability. Another bonus? Teens accustomed to correcting messages before sending them become better self-editors.
It’s true: Conversational atrophy can morph into rudeness. We all have stories. Mine is about the future son-in-law of a good friend; described as bright, funny, and interesting. He showed none of that at a recent family gathering because he spent most of the evening fixated, like a snake on a chipmunk, on the glowing screen of his smartphone. It seems it was draft night in his fantasy football league, and he needed a running back. When I asked him about it, he was surprised that anyone thought he was rude. He was listening, he said. Just multitasking.
While it may not often seem like it, texting does have its own etiquette and set of rules, if loose. There will always be those who disregard the rules of etiquette, no matter the forum. But by and large, technology has not ruined expression. It has empowered it—no different than when we put down the quill pen and picked up the telephone.
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Quote of The Day - Excellence From Abraham Lincoln



 President Lincoln had so many wonderful quotations, they are always special to post.
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“I do the very best I know how, the very best I can, and I mean to keep on doing so until the end.”
― Abraham Lincoln
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Friday, July 4, 2014

Netiquette Basic Effective Types of Email - Via Netiquette IQ


Everyone wants to be good, even the best at what they do. My main points in my book, speaking sessions, interviews on the Netiquette IQ Radio program and in this blog, is to focus on the best parts of Netiquette. This positions you to better succeed in the purposes of your communications.

The following is a nice summary about some categories of email message types. I believe that everyone will find value in reading it!
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The 6 Most Effective Types of Email

BY Michael Fertik   Last updated: Jun 27, 2014,  Inc.com
I'll cop to (possibly) having lost control of my inbox now and again, swamped by the waves of incoming missives flowing over the transom.  Yet it still remains one of the most convenient and speedy forms of global communication.
That said, we could all probably do less of it.  Much, much less.  But here are six email types worth the electronic ink:
The Big Vision
Are you a leader in your company--or of a business?  People like to be in a ship steered by a visionary captain.  Trouble is, they won't know the shape of your vision unless you tell them.  And you'll need to take a cue from the advertising world--where you hear slogans over and over until they're inextricably linked with their product and you're left wondering why you just can't bear to live one more second without that new iPad.  Retention is the name of the game.  Employees need to hear your message over and over--so when a milestone happens, publicize it internally and link it back to your vision.  When someone does something great for the company, recognize them and reinforce how it helps bring that big picture into better focus.  Continually connect the dots.
The Gratitude Message
There is always a reason to say thank you.  The employee who went the extra mile.  Your entire workforce at year-end.  A family member who picked up your kids when you were stuck or the friend who was there during a personal crisis.  An investor who made a pivotal connection for you.  Try sending one around established holidays, typically a more relaxed time when a personal message is likely to resonate more.  A quick, heartfelt expression of gratitude says someone else's efforts, good deed or positive intentions did not go unnoticed and was, in fact, very appreciated.
The Relationship Repair
Leaders can hose it up like anyone else.  If you're prevented from saying it in person, an emailed apology--brief, sincere, and clear--can go a long way to mending a relationship that's been dented by your bad mood, bad call or bad act.
The Delegation
Move things off your plate!  Good leaders are always striving to make the biggest bang for their buck.  That's true with financials and it should be equally as true with your time.  If you understand your team's individual strengths, delegating should be short work for you.  And if a project seems to be just on the margins of a person's current ability, give it to that individual anyway.  With the proper guidance, a stretch assignment can light a fire and fuel growth for a person.
The Connection
I've written about this before, but one of the best things you can do is introduce people who ought to know one another.  Perhaps they share common professional goals and interests.  Maybe an investor is looking for the next big thing in health tech and it so happens you know an enterprising entrepreneur whose idea needs funding.  Or perhaps it's an established professional and a person new to the workforce  who could benefit from mutual mentoring.  A quick intro and you've paid your professional karma toll for the week.
The Polite, Pointed Smackdown
There are times when it's useful to have a clear, direct expression of your unhappiness on the record.  There's no need to be a jerk about it--however, when someone has not met the expectations you've outlined, it needs to be noted.  It's sometimes best to convey these hard truths verbally--but there's also a time and place for the well-devised electronic missive.  Be to the point and remind the person of your mutual understanding (e.g. Supplier X, in all our communications to date, we were clear the delivery date was last Friday).  Outline why the lapse is not acceptable (e.g. As we've discussed, a late delivery puts our entire schedule at risk and incurs a penalty cost with our end customer of 15 percent).  Make it clear what resolution you expect and in what timeframe (e.g. We expect the delivery no later than Wednesday along with a 50 percent refund.).  Remember--you are not out to ruin someone's day by being pejorative or unfairly harsh but it can be within your rights to put that person squarely on notice.
What are the most useful emails you send?
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Quote of The Day - A Bonus Two For Today! Topic of Internet Neutrality




Yesterday's blog spoke to Internet neutrality. Al Franken, a United States senator from Minnesota really is accurate in this quotation. His opponents are big supports of the largest Internet traffic providers in the world.
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"Net neutrality isn't a government takeover of the Internet, as many of my Republican colleagues have alleged."
Al Franken
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I decided to add this additional quotation because I believe it is a good one and two are better than one!
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“Net neutrality is a concept that the tech industry rallies around, but it is hypocrisy.”

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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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