Saturday, December 13, 2014

Netiquette IQ Blog Of The Day - Just How Many People Do Have Email Privacy and Access?


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 It is part of this blog's commitment to Internet freedom, access and privacy to report significant information and to make comments on the these items. Here is another example on disparity on the Internet. When you combine this number with the fact over four billion people still do not have access to the Internet, it is eye opening to say the least!
Our world still hav\s far to go to expand the real knowledge base and communication capabilities throughout the world.
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1.8 Billion Internet Users Have Little or No Right to Online Privacy: Web Index
by Cheryl Kemp on Friday, December 12 2014, 3:16 pm www.thewhir
The Web Index rankings released Thursday measure social, political and economic benefit countries around the world get from the web. Wealthy Scandinavian countries and the UK continue to dominate the index with the US coming in sixth.
Starting in 2012, the World Wide Web Foundation began to produce this index based on data to measure the web’s contribution to the world in the areas of social, political and economic progress in each country.
When web creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee and CERN didn’t patent the web it led to the possibility that it could create a worldwide level-playing field with unprecedented access to information. “Today, armed with little more than a smartphone, anyone — regardless of where they were born or how much they earn — can start a business, record a music video, crowdfund an invention, take courses with Nobel Prize-winning professors, or even launch a successful campaign for office,” the report said.
Political censorship is increasing with about 40 percent of countries blocking political or socially sensitive content, up from 32 percent last year. There is lack of net neutrality in 74 percent of countries. Net neutrality has been a particularly hot topic in the US lately with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) basically taking matters into its own hands rather than listening to the more than a million public comments that were sent to the agency. Only one percent of the US public is opposed to net neutrality, according to the Sunlight Foundation report.
Governments have enough money to invest in the control of the web and have been affecting what people are able to post online. Due to state-sponsored censorship, at least 1.8 billion Internet users have little or no right to privacy or freedom of expression.
“Legal safeguards against government snooping on our communications were eroded or bypassed in many countries in the past year, with 84 percent of Web Index countries failing our test for basic privacy safeguards, up from 63 percent in the 2013 Index,” according to the report. For example, the UK passed emergency legislation in July to give law enforcement access to phone and internet records.
The report listed three ways in which the web has the capacity to balance inequality: access to knowledge, political participation and lowering barriers to new businesses innovation and creation.
According to webindex.org, the index measures and ranks:
·         Universal Access: This sub-Index measures whether countries have invested in affordable access to high quality internet infrastructure, as well as investing in the education and skills citizens need to use the Web well.
·         Freedom and Openness: This sub-Index assesses the extent to which citizens enjoy rights to information, opinion, expression, safety and privacy online.
·         Relevant Content: This sub-Index maps both Web use by citizens and the content available in each country, with an emphasis on the extent to which different stakeholders can access information that is relevant to them, in the language that they are most comfortable using and via platforms and channels that are widely available.
·         Empowerment: This sub-Index aims to assess the difference that the Web is making to people, and the extent to which use of the Web by stakeholders is fostering positive change in four key areas: society, economy, politics and environment.
The report also notes that “one in five female Internet users live in countries where harassment and abuse of women online is extremely unlikely to be punished.”
With access to the internet still unavailable to about 4.4 billion people, it’s not surprising that the countries with the highest Web Index correlate with higher per capita income. That’s why it’s important to support programs such as Project Loon, SpaceX and Internet.org which all seek to use creative technologies such as satellite, balloons and drones to cover the world with Internet access. Cost of basic Internet in the poorest countries is ten times the cost of that in richer countries with use that is ten times lower.
“This sets a very clear challenge for the international community. People living in poverty must be able to use the web to improve their lives and their communities every bit as much as affluent groups. The steep slope on the graph needs to be flattened out, making the Web truly ‘for everyone’,” said the report. “Unless and until that happens, the web can’t become an effective weapon to fight poverty and inequality globally. Indeed, it may even contribute to worsening inequality.”
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:
 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki
 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Technical Term of The Day - Four-factor Authentication (4FA)

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Four-factor authentication (4FA)
Four-factor authentication (4FA) is the use of four types of identity-confirming credentials, typically categorized as knowledge, possession, inherence and location factors.
Four-factor authentication is a newer security paradigm than two-factor or three-factor authentication. Four factor systems are sometimes used in businesses and government agencies that require extremely high security. Higher levels of multifactor authentication categories make it increasingly unlikely that an attacker can fake or steal all elements involved.
  • Knowledge factors include all things a user must know in order to log in, such as a user name and password or personal identification number (PIN).
  • Possession factors include anything a user must have in their possession to log in, such as a one- time password token (OTP token) or a smartphone with an OTP app.
  • Inherence factors include biometric user data that are confirmed for login, such as iris scans, fingerprint scans and voice recognition.
User location is sometimes considered a fourth factor for authentication. The ubiquity of smartphones can help ease the burden:  Most smartphones have a GPS device, enabling reasonable surety confirmation of the login location. Lower surety measures might be the MAC address of the login point or physical presence verification through cards, for example.
Sometimes time is considered a fourth or fifth factor. Verification of employee IDs against work schedules, for example, can prevent some kinds of user hijacking attacks. An American bank customer can't physically use his ATM card at home and then in Russia within 15 minutes. Because time could be used as a distinct confirming category, it may eventually be considered a separate factor, which could make five-factor authentication (5FA) a possibility.
The use of at least one element of each of the four factor categories is considered four-factor authentication. The application of four authentication elements out of two or three categories counts as two- or three-factor authentication, respectively.
The reliability of authentication depends not only on the number of factors involved but also on how they are implemented. Options selected for authentication rules greatly affect the security of each factor. Lax rules and implementations result in weaker security.
Care must be taken, on the other hand, not to overburden users with difficult authentication routines, not only out of consideration for users but for security as well. Throughout IT history, users have always found ways of subverting rules for easier logins. Often, these efforts result in lowered security.
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:
 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki
 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Quotation of The Day - Technology From Albert Einstein


"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity." - Albert Einstein
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:
 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki
 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Friday, December 12, 2014

Netiquette IQ Concepts of Tone In The 12/12/14 Blog of The Day

I have often stated in this blog and in my book (referenced below) that many people take on a new persona when they are on the Internet, most especially when they want to impress. Some of these attempts come across in a very blatant way. Sometimes they are true laughable! The posting below cleverly speaks to some funny examples. Having you ever done any of these?
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What People Say On The Internet, Vs What They Mean
I can’t even with these social media clich├ęs.
 
posted on Oct. 28, 2014, at 9:16 a.m.

Luke Lewis BuzzFeed
1. #Hashtagging #every #word #in #a #sentence - I don’t understand what hashtags are, so I use them on everything to be on the safe side.
2. Writing. Full. Stops. After. Every. Word - I am overly dramatic.
3. “A thing I wrote …” - I am a journalist and am pretending to be off-hand about an article that I am secretly extremely pleased with.
4. ”Thrilled to announce” - I have got a new job and I demand praise.
“Smart take” - I am a serious person sharing serious articles.
5. “Another wonderful column by @caitlinmoran” - I am sucking up to a celebrity in the deluded hope of a follow.
6. “LOL” - I am entirely stony faced as I type this on my phone while queuing up at the Post Office.
7. “RIP :-(“ - I am tweeting the news of a celebrity death in a shameless bid to win retweets.
8. “YOLO” - I have just done something incredibly pedestrian and unremarkable.
9. “Just sayin’” - I didn’t know how to end this tweet. Will this do?
10. “OMG” - I am excitable.
11. “ZOMG” - I am zany.
12. “OMGGGG” - I am irritating.
13. “WTF” - I am confused.
14. “FFS” - I am angry.
15. “FTW” - I am impressed.
16. “Amazing” - I am easily impressed.
17. “UH-MA-ZING” - I am a simpleton.
18. “Amazeballs” - For some reason I adopt the vocabulary of a five-year-old whenever I go on the internet.
19. “Two more sleeps until …” - I expect you to find my use of language kooky and eccentric.
20. “Nom nom nom” - I am about to eat some delicious food. Also, I am a cretin.
21. “Totes” - I live in West London.
22. “OMG so random” - I don’t know what random means.
23. “I can’t even” - I think I’m in Clueless.
24. “On the interwebs” - I am too wacky to just say ‘internet’.
25. “This wins the internet” - Here is a moderately amusing YouTube clip featuring a dog on a surfboard.
26. “Meh” - I am a joyless person who refuses to be impressed by anything.
27. “I just spat my tea out!” - I didn’t, but I want you to know I found this amusing.
28. “I just ran 10k in 47 minutes with Fitbit” - It’s not enough for me to feel healthy. I need you to feel guilty about being less healthy than me.
29. “Just completed a 4.03 mile run with #runkeeper” - I also scarfed down an entire sharing bag of Doritos while watching Take Me Out but I’m not willing to share that.
30. “Amazing weekend. Feeling so blessed to have so many wonderful friends” - Not like you. Your friends are rubbish and all your weekends are miserable.
31. “Thanks for all the birthday messages!” - Important reminder to anyone who hasn’t yet acknowledged my birthday – this is your last chance. And yes, I will notice if you don’t.
32. “Can’t believe so-called friends would stoop so low” - I am deliberately leaving a vague Facebook status in the hope that people will give me some attention and ask what happened.
33. “Come on you Spurs!!!!” - I realise most of you are not watching this match and will be baffled by this update, but I simply don’t care.
34. “Cheeky selfie with my besties” - God I’m wonderful. Admit it, you’d kill to be me.
35. Losing love is like a window in your heart … - Lyrics from a song that I am currently listening to, and somewhat arrogantly assume will resonate with you as well.
36. “26 miles done. Still just about in one piece!” - Meanwhile you’re still in bed, hungover, scrolling glumly through Facebook. I pity you.
37. “Two and a half years ago today we welcomed our little angel into the world” - I think I am the first man in the history of the world ever to father offspring.
38. “Josh just did his first grown-up poo! So proud” - I am so utterly lacking in self-awareness I expect you to find this cute.
39. “Daddy’s little soldier sleeping soundly. #awwww” - He’s been an absolute little git all day.
40. “After sex #selfie” - I am an appalling human being.
41. “Nightclub #selfie” - Look at me.
42. “Bus stop #selfie” - Look at me.
43. “Brushing my teeth #selfie” - Look at me.
44. “‘Taking a selfie #selfie” - Look at me.
45. “Taking the recycling out #selfie” - LOOK AT ME.
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:
 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki
 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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