Saturday, October 4, 2014

Ten Core Netiquette Tips to Improve Your Email in Five Minutes




Throughout all of my blogs, I have offered many suggestions on email issues. Some of these are simple, others involve utilizing a process.

It suddenly occurred to me earlier that most of us would like to have a means of quickly improving our email skills, at least some of them. Therefore I have put together a composite of suggestions and ask you, the reader, to deploy these and combine them with some of your own.
Five Minutes

When you choose these, consciously implement them in your emails over the course of one week. See if an improvement happens. One more suggestion . . .do all you can to make them permanent!

Do I use respond too quickly when angry?
Do I correct people's mistakes unnecessarily?
Are my emails consistent in tone?
Do I often criticize others?
Do I respond within 24 hours?
Do I use too much humor or sarcasm?
Do I use company email for personal use?
Do I stay on patient?
Do I provide an acknowledgement to received email?
Do I show enthusiasm?

Good Netiquette to all!
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, " Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ and  PSG of Mercer County, NJ.
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Netiquette IQ Technical Term of The Day - RADIUS

From www.whatis.com

Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) is a client/server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service. RADIUS allows a company to maintain user profiles in a central database that all remote servers can share. It provides better security, allowing a company to set up a policy that can be applied at a single administered network point. Having a central service also means that it's easier to track usage for billing and for keeping network statistics. Created by Livingston (now owned by Lucent), RADIUS is a de facto industry standard used by a number of network product companies and is a proposed IETF standard.
This was first published in June 2007

Netiquette IQ Quotation of The Day - The Internet and Privacy

My blog of 10/3/14 is on Freedom on the Internet. Here is a quotation of the wisdom of Internet privacy!
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"Privacy is not an option, and it shouldn't be the price we accept for just getting on the Internet."
Gary Kovacs
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 In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Friday, October 3, 2014

Netiquette IQ - Why Phone and Cable Companies Want to Kill the Internet


 
This blog has postings about privacy and Internet neutrality quite often. Without this, the entire community of netizens is in very real real danger of compromise in many parts of our lives.  All of us must be mindful with developments, laws and changes to do out part to keep the Internet free with equal access for all! Below is a nice article explaining some disturbing purposes by service providers.
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Why Phone and Cable Companies Want to Kill the Internet's Most Democratic Right
Posted: 10/03/2014 7:51 am EDT Updated: 10/03/2014 9:59 am EDT

Net Neutrality -- the principle that protects Internet users' free speech rights -- is censorship.

Did you get that? You did if you happened to be reading the Wall Street Journal's editorial pages. Former Federal Communications Commissioner Robert McDowell recently wrote a screed claiming that Net Neutrality supporters have taken a turn "toward undermining free speech."

And McDowell is not alone. Since the FCC announced its plan to make a new ruling regarding the open Internet, Washington has been overrun with phone and cable lobbyists whose sole mission is to convince the agency that real Net Neutrality rules are downright un-American.

Industry-funded think tanks have argued that any enforceable effort to protect the open Internet denies phone and cable companies their First Amendment right "by compelling them to convey content providers' messages with which they may disagree."

That these industry voices have mangled the intent of the First Amendment should come as no surprise to anyone witnessing their campaign to undermine the open Internet. (It's a campaign that includes Comcast and Verizon spending millions on a PR campaign that claims they are for Net Neutrality while spending millions more on lobbyists to push Washington to destroy it.)

The Right to Censor

According to many industry spokespeople, the Net Neutrality protections that millions of Americans are fighting for are an "attempt to turn the Internet into... a federally regulated public utility." In the view of McDowell and others, Net Neutrality is bad for free speech because it takes away broadband providers' unalienable right to censor you.

As an FCC decision on the matter grows nearer, the rhetoric from lobbyists will become even more extreme.

If any of this sounds familiar, it's because Verizon's lawyers made a similarly distorted argument in 2013 before a federal appeals court, claiming that the First Amendment meant that Internet service providers were the Internet's editors -- free to pick and choose what content gets delivered to customers and what content ends up in a digital dust bin.

The First Amendment "protects those transmitting the speech of others, and those who 'exercise editorial discretion' in selecting which speech to transmit and how to transmit it," Verizon's attorneys wrote in a brief to the court. "In performing these functions, broadband providers possess 'editorial discretion.' Just as a newspaper is entitled to decide which content to publish and where, broadband providers may feature some content over others."

Did you get that? As a last-mile connection between its customers and the network itself, Verizon has the right to block any content that flows across the Web to or from its users.

Common Carriage: The Means of Free Speech

If this is beginning to sound Orwellian, that's because it is. For years now, phone and cable companies have likened the Internet to their private property, a domain over which they have ultimate say.

Under this scenario, Net Neutrality violates the phone and cable companies' rights as "individuals" -- none being more sacred than the right to free speech (or, in their view, the right to throw all other speakers off the front porch).

What's lost in this spin is this: The Internet is not the private property of AT&T, Comcast and Verizon. It's a network of networks (some private and some public) that depends on a common set of rules to transport information, connect people and function. The most important rule for preserving free speech online is common carriage, the classification that prohibits these access providers from interfering with the content that flows through their pipes.

Returning the Internet to the widely used common-carrier standard is what these industry types fear most. It's a fear that has reached a fever pitch after an overwhelming majority of the public urged the FCC to protect real Net Neutrality and reclassify broadband providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act.

The public outpouring of support for Title II has set alarms ringing at the headquarters of the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, the lobbying group that's led the industry's decades-long effort to destroy the one principle that preserves the Internet's open and democratic nature.

According to established law, common carriage applies to any carrier that "holds itself out ... to carry for all people" without interference. It was originally applied to transportation like railroads and ferries, but became an essential standard for open communications. Any two-way communications network that serves the public is not supposed to block, degrade or otherwise unreasonably discriminate in the transmission of the content it carries across its networks.

Common carriage extends free speech principles to privately owned networks, promoting interconnection and the widest possible sharing of content while ensuring a marketplace that's bolstered by competition.

Common carriage works well across the U.S. economy. It applies to wireless carriers (like Sprint) and more than 1,000 small rural carriers (like Iowa Network Services) offering DSL and fiber access.

Your Right to Connect and Communicate

Congress defined the common-carrier obligations of telecommunications services as transmitting information between points of users' choosing without unjust discrimination. After intense lobbying by phone and cable companies, the FCC removed broadband service providers from that classification during the Bush-era, creating the legal mess that now envelops the agency.

"McDowell needs to regain some common sense about common carriage," says Marvin Ammori, a First Amendment scholar who runs an Internet policy consultancy in Washington, D.C. "Are your phone lines censored? Are enterprise lines censored? Are mobile voice services censored? All of these are common carriers. We need the same assurances with our Internet communications."

The framers of the U.S. Constitution could not have foreseen a time in which technology allowed more than 2.7 billion people to communicate via interconnected digital platforms. Nor could they have envisioned a world in which companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon wield more authority over free speech than a British monarch.

The sheer scale of free speech today is without precedent; more people than ever before are able to connect and communicate. Going forward, these Internet users need common-carrier rules, as much as the First Amendment, to protect this most democratic right.

-- Originally published by PBS MediaShift.

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 In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Technical Term of The Day - Network Functions Virtualization



 From whatis.com 10/2/14

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Network functions virtualization
Network functions virtualization (NFV) is an initiative to virtualize the network services that are now being carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware. If successful, NFV will decrease the amount of proprietary hardware that's needed to launch and operate network services. 

The goal of NFV is to decouple network functions from dedicated hardware devices and allow network services that are now being carried out by routers, firewalls, load balancers and other dedicated hardware devices to be hosted on virtual machines (VMs). Once the network functions are under the control of a hypervisor, the services that used to require dedicated hardware can be performed on standard x86 servers. 

This capability is important because it means that network administrators will no longer need to purchase dedicated hardware devices in order to build a service chain. Because server capacity will be able to be added through software, there will be no need for for network administrators to overprovision their data centers which will reduce both capital expenses (CAPex) and operating expenses (OPex).

If an application running on a VM required more bandwidth, for example, the administrator could move the VM to another physical server or provision another virtual machine on the original server to take part of the load. Having this flexibility will allow an IT department to respond in a more agile manner to changing business goals and network service demands. 


The NFV concept, which was presented by a group of network service providers at the SDN and OpenFlow World Congress in October 2012, is being developed by the ETSI Industry Specification Group (ISG) for Network Functions Virtualization.
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 In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Netiquette IQ Quotation of The Day - An Inspiration To Rejection

Yesterday's blog was about rejection emails. It dealt with how to react from rejection externally. This quote is an inspirational one to help internally.
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“Every time I thought I was being rejected from something good, I was actually being re-directed to something better.”
― Steve Maraboli
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 In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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Thursday, October 2, 2014

10 Core Netiquette Principles For Reacting To a Rejection Email - A Real Test of Your Netiquette IQ!

When you receive a rejection email of any kind, showing extreme emotion or sour grapes are the last things you should react in doing.Instead use the core principles outlined below

Oliver Goldsmith

“He who fights and runs away
May live to fight another day;
But he who is battle slain
Can never rise to fight again"

- Oliver Goldsmith


Ten Correct Principles to follow from a Rejection Letter

1.                Thank all parties involved immediately
2.                Keep a good tone
3.                Do not criticize the criteria
4.                Do not criticize the selection, if known
5.                Do not ask for more clarification if already given
6.                Ask if you can stay in touch
7.                If you find and accept another job, let it be known in a good way
8.                Follow-up on a regular basis
9.               Let the recruiters, managers know you are following the company
10.            Wish for the best
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In addition to this blog, I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, "Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki


 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  and an online newsletter via paper.li.I have established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and  Yahoo I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and I have been contributing to the blogs Everything Email and emailmonday . My work has appeared in numerous publications and I have presented to groups such as The Breakfast Club of NJ Rider University and  PSG of Mercer County New Jersey.

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