Monday, May 12, 2014

Netiquette - Differences Between a Command And a Suggestion - Via Netiquette IQ


When you use an imperative or a phrase which sounds as though it is, there can be be some real wrongly assumed interpretations. Additionally, your tone can be ruined. Today's blog gives significant advice to assist you in avoiding this.
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Differences between a command and a suggestion

            It can be very difficult to differentiate a command from a suggestion or appeal. Take the following example:
Let’s meet in the office early tomorrow.
Is the above a command, request, or suggestion? By itself, it would be very difficult to tell. When a specific end result is desired, the sentence needs to be structured or expanded to clearly represent the sender’s tone. If the above sentence is going to a subordinate, the message should be clear—it is a command.
            Should the above message be addressed to a friend or close peer, then we can be fairly certain that the sentence is an open invitation. Finally, when the same message is sent to a customer or less than familiar person, the message can, once again, be interpreted in several ways. The worst of these would be for the recipient to presume this was a command or an attempt to manipulate for a desired outcome. Proper email Netiquette espouses using suggestive words or phrases when a sentence can be read as a command. In the sentence above a far less imperative assumption can read:
“I suggest we meet in the office tomorrow morning at 10 am. Is this a good time for you?”
Similarly, but in a more polite manner, the sentence can be stated:
“Please meet me tomorrow in the office at 10 am. Is this convenient?”
Even better:
“Please meet me tomorrow morning in the office, if this is convenient. Anytime close to 10 am is best for me.”
The following are imperative words or phrases that should be avoided or used carefully:
Let’s…
Don’t…
Call me…
You must…
You can’t…
Be here at…
Stop…
You better…
Hold off…
Listen…